Should young talented readers be considered gifted students?

Author

Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell

 

Due to the lack of empirical research that currently exists on talented readers this paper takes a three-tiered approach to determining whether our talented readers should be considered gifted students. First, this paper investigates the literature on talented readers; then it reviews relevant issues in reading theory; and finally it discusses how these concepts currently sit within gifted education.

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Vol30_3_Michelle_BannisterTyrrell.pdf (41 downloads)

 

Keywords: talented reader, precocious reader, gifted

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The identification of gifted children in Australia: The importance of policy

Author

Eileen Slater

 

Historically, Australia has lacked a consistent approach to identifying gifted children, not just between States and Territories, but between the districts within them and from one school to the next. A consistent approach requires a common definition of giftedness and well defined identification policies and procedures. This article summarises the policies espoused and practices recommended by the public education authorities (Departments of Education) in the identification of gifted children in the six States and two mainland Territories that comprise Australia. The analysis included the review of publically available policies and guidelines accessible through government departmental web-sites and correspondence with State and regional curriculum or gifted education coordinators, where they existed, to ensure accuracy of representation. Recommendations include being more prescriptive in the instruments, methods and procedures which are mandated for use and including the procedures by which schools, principals and teachers will be held accountable for implementing gifted policies as a part of the policies themselves.

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Vol30_1_Eileen_Slater.pdf (311 downloads)

 

Keywords: gifted, policy, identification

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Listening and responding to twice exceptional students: Voices from within

Authors

Michelle Ronksley-Pavia and Geraldine Townend

 

This paper presents findings from two separate research projects conducted between 2012 and 2015, which together examined the experiences of 19 twice exceptional children. The first study used a mixed methods approach with eleven students to investigate their educational experiences through quantitative instruments and in-depth interviews. The second study used narrative case study inquiry methods to elicit eight children’s in-school and out-of-school experiences of being twice exceptional, using the unique method of interviewing the children in their own home settings.

Relatively little is known about the educational experiences of twice exceptional children, particularly in Australia, and how their experiences may contribute to our understanding of individual needs. Findings across both studies point to twice exceptional children’s insights about their giftedness and their disability. These insights reflect feelings of being different to their peers, issues with interpersonal relationships; such as bullying and limited understanding from others. Many of these experiences increased stress and anxiety levels, which were further exacerbated by some educators’ frequent focus on disability rather than ability. These negative experiences were often ameliorated by out-of-school support, personal interests, and both parental and self-advocacy. Together, the findings.

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Vol29_3_Ronksley_Pavia_and_Townend.pdf (330 downloads)

 

Keywords: Twice exceptional, gifted, educational experiences, narrative inquiry

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Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration and its use with gifted children

Authors

Anke Jennaway & Peter Merrotsy

 

Dabrowski’s Theory of Positive Disintegration is a theory about personality development. It has been hailed by some, including Mendaglio (2008), as a ‘theory for the 21st century’. In the past thirty years, its use has gained popularity, particularly in the fields of education and counselling of gifted students. The fundamental basis of this theory, however, has rarely been questioned. This article analyses the nature of the research supporting the theory, and highlights some of the issues in the origins and validation of the theory, advising that, as a framework for identifying, understanding and counselling the gifted, it should be used with caution.

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Vol27_5_Jennaway_and_Merrotsy (247 downloads)

 

Keywords: Dabrowski, positive disintegration, gifted

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Academic acceleration in Australia: An annotated bibliography

Authors

Sue Vasilevska & Peter Merrotsy

 

As will be seen from a quick perusal of the References to this article, there are over 50 Australian publications on academic acceleration. While preparing a review of the literature for a research study on academic acceleration, the authors noticed two things: first, that the Australian studies on academic acceleration, and Australian literature discussing academic acceleration, cited literature mainly from, if not restricted to, North America; and, second, that the literature, including the Australian literature, on academic acceleration tended to overlook or completely ignore the findings from Australian research in this area. A first step in addressing this perceived problem is to make the Australian research on academic acceleration more accessible, to Australian researchers as well as to researchers from other countries. This annotated bibliography on academic acceleration in Australia is published with this purpose in mind. The authors would welcome reference citations of any research articles that have been overlooked in this bibliography.

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Vol27_6_Vasilevska_and_Merrotsy (166 downloads)

 

Keywords: acceleration, academic acceleration, gifted

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