Taming a ‘many-headed monster’: Tarricone’s taxonomy of metacognition

Authors

Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell, Susen Smith, Peter Merrotsy & Linley Cornish

 

The research field of metacognition sees a community lacking in rigour, continuity and shared understandings (Schraw, 2009; Shaughnessy, Veenman & Kleyn-Kennedy, 2008). The publication in 2011 of Pina Tarricone’s conceptual framework and taxonomy of metacognition offered a ‘comprehensive and systematic overview of the literature on metacognition’ (Moshman, 2010, cited in Tarricone, 2011, p. xv), finally giving some necessary synthesis to the field. In this paper we briefly introduce some of the difficulties that continue to attribute to the inconsistency of metacognition as a concept and give an overview of Tarricone’s taxonomy of metacognition. We also describe how the taxonomy contributes to deeper understandings of one popular model in gifted education. Current research is making strong links between metacognition and giftedness (Veenman, 2008), but importantly there is growing evidence that metacognition is an ‘aspect of intelligence that can be more easily promoted by education’ (Cornoldi, 2010, p. 257). Due to the complexity and detail of Tarricone’s work and the actual taxonomy itself, it is acknowledged that this paper presents only a brief review and discussion of some of the aspects of the taxonomy, such as the supercategories of declarative, procedural and conditional knowledge. The importance of the interconnectedness of these aspects of Tarricone’s framework is discussed in relation to how they underlie the metacognition and epistemic beliefs of a student to facilitate or inhibit learning.

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Vol28_1_BannisterTyrrell_Smith_Merrotsy_and_Cornish (233 downloads)

 

Keywords: metacognition, giftedness, Tarricone, taxonomy

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Parents’ perceptions of social-emotional issues in composite classes

Author

Linley Cornish

 

This article is a companion article to Cornish (2011), reporting the results of a mixed-methods study in a large regional Australian primary school. Parents were surveyed to ascertain their perceptions of and concerns about composite classes in general, and about their own children being in such classes. Factor analysis revealed five factors perceived as relevant to the parents: Knowledge-experience of composite classes, their child’s holistic Development (academic and social), grade Identity, and being in either the Younger or Older grade of the class. Three significant relationships were identified by path analysis and subsequently explored by means of descriptive and qualitative analyses. In this article, I concentrate again on one conclusion from the literature review: Parents have a holistic concern for their child’s development in a composite class, that is, they have both academic and social concerns which are at least in part related to age and grade. This time, I discuss parents’ perceptions and concerns related to social and emotional development/issues in a composite class. In their written comments parents expressed definite views about composite classes and the effect on social-emotional development of being in the younger or older grade of a composite class. Specific concerns related to confidence, restricted friendship choice, loss of grade identity, exposure to inappropriate social behaviours (for younger-grade students), and engagement of older-grade students in nurturing youngergrade students.

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Vol28_2_Linley_Cornish (189 downloads)

Keywords: composite classes, parent perceptions, academic concerns, social concerns

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Educators’ attitudes towards gifted students and their education in a regional Queensland school

Author

Vanessa Bartley

 

As the primary providers in meeting the educational needs of gifted students, educators are pivotal in the provision of positive experiences for these students. The Gagné–Nadeau Attitude Scale: Opinions about the gifted and their education, was used to determine the attitudes of educators in a regional Queensland school toward gifted students and their education. Educators at the school were also asked to provide information pertaining to their preservice and professional learning in regard to gifted education. Results indicated that educators at the school are, overall, ambivalent in their attitudes towards gifted students and their education. There is no indication that specialised pre-service education or isolated professional learning experiences affect teacher attitudes in this area. Future research could include the development of an attitudinal survey drawn from the Australian educational context along with research into how to improve educators’ attitudes and practice in this area.

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Vol28_3_Vanessa_Bartley (273 downloads)

 

Keywords: Gagné-Nadeau, teacher attitudes, gifted education

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Enhancing creativity for gifted and talented students: A visual arts classroom

Author

Michelle Ronksley-Pavia

 

The popular notion of creativity in schools is that of the creative arts student or the creative writer, yet creativity can be utilised as a particular way of thinking with regards to producing information and learning at school which can be applicable across curriculum areas. Many traits and characteristics of gifted students overlap those of creative students as identified in the literature. This paper includes examples of techniques teachers can employ in developing creativity within their classroom, with a particular focus on visual arts using The Dynamic Creativity Process Model. This model is designed to be used across the curriculum as a holistic approach to enhancing creativity and the artistic potential of gifted students. The model supports student learning using divergent and convergent thinking and encourages higher-order thinking, integration, intuition and evaluation.

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Vol28_4_Michelle_RonksleyPavia (165 downloads)

 

Keywords: gifted students, creativity, visual arts

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Equity and ethics in talent development

Author

Ian Gunn

 

In this paper, I discuss four seminal articles in the field of talent development. Three articles call for a complete rethinking about how the field is constituted, including a rethinking of terminology. The authors uphold the concept of talent development as the most efficient and equitable model for gifted programming in schools. The fourth article examines ethics and morality in their roles as contributors to the personal and academic development of high-ability students, and the author argues for the proactive and systematic teaching of ethical behaviour at all educational levels. All articles contain practical suggestions for ways to implement the ideas discussed, and thus could have a lasting influence on the field of talent development.

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Vol28_5_Ian_Gunn (139 downloads)

 

Keywords: talent development, equity, ethics

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