Listening and responding to twice exceptional students: Voices from within

Authors

Michelle Ronksley-Pavia and Geraldine Townend

 

This paper presents findings from two separate research projects conducted between 2012 and 2015, which together examined the experiences of 19 twice exceptional children. The first study used a mixed methods approach with eleven students to investigate their educational experiences through quantitative instruments and in-depth interviews. The second study used narrative case study inquiry methods to elicit eight children’s in-school and out-of-school experiences of being twice exceptional, using the unique method of interviewing the children in their own home settings.

Relatively little is known about the educational experiences of twice exceptional children, particularly in Australia, and how their experiences may contribute to our understanding of individual needs. Findings across both studies point to twice exceptional children’s insights about their giftedness and their disability. These insights reflect feelings of being different to their peers, issues with interpersonal relationships; such as bullying and limited understanding from others. Many of these experiences increased stress and anxiety levels, which were further exacerbated by some educators’ frequent focus on disability rather than ability. These negative experiences were often ameliorated by out-of-school support, personal interests, and both parental and self-advocacy. Together, the findings.

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Vol29_3_Ronksley_Pavia_and_Townend.pdf (131 downloads)

 

Keywords: Twice exceptional, gifted, educational experiences, narrative inquiry

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Australian Aboriginal peoples and giftedness: A diverse issue in need of a diverse response

Authors

Genevieve Thraves & Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell

 

For over thirty years sporadic research has attempted to address the underrepresentation of Aboriginal students in gifted programs. What emerges from the literature is the need for cultural understanding, flexibility and sensitivity when dealing with definitional issues of giftedness, and cultural inclusivity when designing talent development programs that respond to the particular needs of gifted learners from Aboriginal backgrounds. This article will explore these issues and highlight the need for schools to value the funds of knowledge Aboriginal students bring to their classrooms, which in turn will allow for more appropriate identification protocols and programs to be put in place for these students.

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Vol29_2_Thraves_and_Bannister_Tyrrell.pdf (215 downloads)

 

Keywords: giftedness, Aboriginal, underrepresentation, cultural inclusivity

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The International Baccalaureate Program: Meeting the needs of high-ability students in Qatar

Author

Jeff MacRaild

 

This article presents an analysis of the International Baccalaureate’s Middle Years Program (MYP) to determine the extent to which it is suitable to address the learning needs of gifted students in the educational context of Qatar. The student population comprises predominantly Qatari nationals and citizens from neighbouring Arab cultures in the Gulf Corporation Council (GCC) countries. The dynamics of this context involve the interrelationships of three conceptual elements: the cultural and educational context of Qatar; conceptions, identification and nurture of giftedness; and the International Baccalaureate’s MYP. Each of these elements is examined individually and then in relation to one another in order to determine the potential for the three contexts to interact or intersect.

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Vol29_1_Jeff_MacRaild (122 downloads)

 

Keywords: high ability, science, International Baccalaureate, Qatar

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Taming a ‘many-headed monster’: Tarricone’s taxonomy of metacognition

Authors

Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell, Susen Smith, Peter Merrotsy & Linley Cornish

 

The research field of metacognition sees a community lacking in rigour, continuity and shared understandings (Schraw, 2009; Shaughnessy, Veenman & Kleyn-Kennedy, 2008). The publication in 2011 of Pina Tarricone’s conceptual framework and taxonomy of metacognition offered a ‘comprehensive and systematic overview of the literature on metacognition’ (Moshman, 2010, cited in Tarricone, 2011, p. xv), finally giving some necessary synthesis to the field. In this paper we briefly introduce some of the difficulties that continue to attribute to the inconsistency of metacognition as a concept and give an overview of Tarricone’s taxonomy of metacognition. We also describe how the taxonomy contributes to deeper understandings of one popular model in gifted education. Current research is making strong links between metacognition and giftedness (Veenman, 2008), but importantly there is growing evidence that metacognition is an ‘aspect of intelligence that can be more easily promoted by education’ (Cornoldi, 2010, p. 257). Due to the complexity and detail of Tarricone’s work and the actual taxonomy itself, it is acknowledged that this paper presents only a brief review and discussion of some of the aspects of the taxonomy, such as the supercategories of declarative, procedural and conditional knowledge. The importance of the interconnectedness of these aspects of Tarricone’s framework is discussed in relation to how they underlie the metacognition and epistemic beliefs of a student to facilitate or inhibit learning.

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Vol28_1_BannisterTyrrell_Smith_Merrotsy_and_Cornish (154 downloads)

 

Keywords: metacognition, giftedness, Tarricone, taxonomy

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Parents’ perceptions of social-emotional issues in composite classes

Author

Linley Cornish

 

This article is a companion article to Cornish (2011), reporting the results of a mixed-methods study in a large regional Australian primary school. Parents were surveyed to ascertain their perceptions of and concerns about composite classes in general, and about their own children being in such classes. Factor analysis revealed five factors perceived as relevant to the parents: Knowledge-experience of composite classes, their child’s holistic Development (academic and social), grade Identity, and being in either the Younger or Older grade of the class. Three significant relationships were identified by path analysis and subsequently explored by means of descriptive and qualitative analyses. In this article, I concentrate again on one conclusion from the literature review: Parents have a holistic concern for their child’s development in a composite class, that is, they have both academic and social concerns which are at least in part related to age and grade. This time, I discuss parents’ perceptions and concerns related to social and emotional development/issues in a composite class. In their written comments parents expressed definite views about composite classes and the effect on social-emotional development of being in the younger or older grade of a composite class. Specific concerns related to confidence, restricted friendship choice, loss of grade identity, exposure to inappropriate social behaviours (for younger-grade students), and engagement of older-grade students in nurturing youngergrade students.

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Vol28_2_Linley_Cornish (124 downloads)

Keywords: composite classes, parent perceptions, academic concerns, social concerns

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