Listening and responding to twice exceptional students: Voices from within

Authors

Michelle Ronksley-Pavia and Geraldine Townend

 

This paper presents findings from two separate research projects conducted between 2012 and 2015, which together examined the experiences of 19 twice exceptional children. The first study used a mixed methods approach with eleven students to investigate their educational experiences through quantitative instruments and in-depth interviews. The second study used narrative case study inquiry methods to elicit eight children’s in-school and out-of-school experiences of being twice exceptional, using the unique method of interviewing the children in their own home settings.

Relatively little is known about the educational experiences of twice exceptional children, particularly in Australia, and how their experiences may contribute to our understanding of individual needs. Findings across both studies point to twice exceptional children’s insights about their giftedness and their disability. These insights reflect feelings of being different to their peers, issues with interpersonal relationships; such as bullying and limited understanding from others. Many of these experiences increased stress and anxiety levels, which were further exacerbated by some educators’ frequent focus on disability rather than ability. These negative experiences were often ameliorated by out-of-school support, personal interests, and both parental and self-advocacy. Together, the findings.

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Vol29_3_Ronksley_Pavia_and_Townend.pdf (330 downloads)

 

Keywords: Twice exceptional, gifted, educational experiences, narrative inquiry

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Australian Aboriginal peoples and giftedness: A diverse issue in need of a diverse response

Authors

Genevieve Thraves & Michelle Bannister-Tyrrell

 

For over thirty years sporadic research has attempted to address the underrepresentation of Aboriginal students in gifted programs. What emerges from the literature is the need for cultural understanding, flexibility and sensitivity when dealing with definitional issues of giftedness, and cultural inclusivity when designing talent development programs that respond to the particular needs of gifted learners from Aboriginal backgrounds. This article will explore these issues and highlight the need for schools to value the funds of knowledge Aboriginal students bring to their classrooms, which in turn will allow for more appropriate identification protocols and programs to be put in place for these students.

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Vol29_2_Thraves_and_Bannister_Tyrrell.pdf (520 downloads)

 

Keywords: giftedness, Aboriginal, underrepresentation, cultural inclusivity

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The International Baccalaureate Program: Meeting the needs of high-ability students in Qatar

Author

Jeff MacRaild

 

This article presents an analysis of the International Baccalaureate’s Middle Years Program (MYP) to determine the extent to which it is suitable to address the learning needs of gifted students in the educational context of Qatar. The student population comprises predominantly Qatari nationals and citizens from neighbouring Arab cultures in the Gulf Corporation Council (GCC) countries. The dynamics of this context involve the interrelationships of three conceptual elements: the cultural and educational context of Qatar; conceptions, identification and nurture of giftedness; and the International Baccalaureate’s MYP. Each of these elements is examined individually and then in relation to one another in order to determine the potential for the three contexts to interact or intersect.

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Vol29_1_Jeff_MacRaild (203 downloads)

 

Keywords: high ability, science, International Baccalaureate, Qatar

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The power of the Minority and the minority of One: Martin D. Jenkins’ Legacy to Gifted Education

Author

Samantha Lobban

 

Following the enactment of the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act 1988, there was much research into educational provision for culturally different students. However, this research was not an anomalous or instantaneous development; rather, it resulted from decades of academic activism. One such scholar was Martin D. Jenkins. An African-American man, Jenkins was born into a Jim Crow-governed society where pedagogical philosophy was marred by the belief that black students were inherently intellectually inferior. Although a rich literature exists which examines Jenkins’ life and works, these texts limit his work to the ‘historical’, thus ignoring the continued significance of his research in twenty-first century Australia. This article critiques the strengths and weaknesses of Jenkins’ work and his enduring legacy to gifted education. It is argued that Martin D. Jenkins was a seminal scholar within the field of gifted education who highlighted key issues such as identification, cultural disadvantage and the need for tailored support and enrichment programs for gifted students. It is concluded that Jenkins’ work, albeit underappreciated, is not only noteworthy within a historical context, but for its continued significance today.

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R_29_Samantha_Lobban.pdf

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Adam Spencer’s big book of numbers: Everything you wanted to know about the numbers 1 to 100

Book Review

by Peter Merrotsy

 

Adam Spencer (2014). Adam Spencer’s big book of numbers: Everything you wanted to know about the numbers 1 to 100

 

Adam Spencer is a self-confessed sleek geek and champion of geeks everywhere, and I am sure that he needs no introduction. Those for whom Spencer is “merely” a Triple J or ABC radio host, Raw Comedy comedian, champion debater, or namesake for Asteroid 18413 may wish to meet the “real” Adam by viewing his TED talk [Accessible Here].
 
The investment of 17 minutes of your time will be well rewarded.

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R_Vol29_Adam_Spencer.pdf

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